Information about the various care options available in later life, including resources and links to useful sources of information.

If you are looking into elderly care for a loved one, it can be really hard to know where to begin. There are lots of options out there and it is important to understand those options so that you make the best possible choice for your loved one. Take a look at these elderly care choices to get a better understanding of current care options and how they work:

Care Homes

Care homes have 24/7 staffing so somebody is always on hand to help your loved one if they need it. Care homes also provide accommodation, usually in the form of a private bedroom with ensuite, although some bathrooms are shared in some care homes. Meals, snacks and drinks are also provided. Care homes tend to help with personal care tasks and nursing services aren’t provided. With a nursing home, the same services as in a care home are provided, but with nursing care on top.

Live-in Care

Live in care is where a trained care professional lives in the home of their client and provides a bespoke care plan based on their clients needs. This could be help with personal tasks like dressing and eating, as well as help with cleaning, pet care, transport and even gardening. The main benefit is that the person gets to stay in the place they love the most, whilst still remaining safe and cared for. It I also possible to receive the same type of care from a visiting carer with home care services if you’d rather not have the carer living with you.

Assisted Living

Assisted living (sometimes known as sheltered housing) is where a person lives in a home independently (usually a flat) and they have a help scheme as part of their living setup. So they may have somebody who checks in on them, there may be a communal social area, there may be carers who provide some support. In some assisted living communities there are even luxury facilities like leisure centres and shopping areas.

Adult Day-Care

Adult day care is where an elderly person is in a special centre with other seniors for care in the day including meals and possibly personal care depending on the centre. The environment provided is safe and ensures that the elderly person is happy and cared for during the hours they attend.

As well as elderly care options, there are lots of other things to consider when it comes to care. The financial side, for example, can be extremely complicated. Only 1.9% of people speak to a qualified IFA (Independent Financial Advisor) about care plans and many people underestimate the expense of care, often leaving them unprepared. It may be you are unaware of financial support you can get with care, and so you may use savings up instead of getting financial support to help. You could also underestimate the amount of care needed, which is why a care assessment is so important.

There is a long road ahead and setting up care is by no means simple. However, with the right support, guidance and information, you can ensure your elderly relative has the kind of later life care they deserve.